Tag Archives: Louis XIV

Film Review: A Little Chaos (2015)

I finally had the chance to see this film for my birthday (my husband bought me the DVD) and I loved every single minute of it. In fact, I was sad when it ended because I loved it so much! I think it was beautifully directed by Alan Rickman and all the actors were very well-cast. The sensitive,… Read on

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Blenheim: The Battle for Europe by Charles Spencer

Although the Battle of Blenheim took place in the 18th Century, the historical persons involved were extremely important in Late 17th-century European history. This book, published in 2005, was the second work by historian Charles Spencer that I have read, the first being his Killers of the King: The Men Who Dared to Kill Charles I, published last year… Read on

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Was Madame Poisoned? Jealousy, Intrigue, and Murder in the Court of Louis XIV – Guest Post by Jessica Cale

I recently ‘met’ Jessica Cale via mutual friends on Facebook and I quickly learned that she writes historical fiction set in the 17th-century (yey!). Today, she stopped by The Seventeenth Century Lady with the lamentable story of Minette, Charles II’s youngest sister. The rumours surrounding her death persist to this day. But was Madame poisoned? Was Madame Poisoned?… Read on

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Dura Lex Sed Lex: Huguenots and the Promises of Kings: Guest Post by Master Piers Alexander, Scribbler

Please welcome award-winning novelist Piers Alexander to The Seventeenth Century Lady! Dura lex sed lex: The law is harsh, but it is the law. For Huguenots in the 1600s, royal edicts were instruments of hope and despair, both in France and in England. Slaughtered for their faith in the sixteenth century (the St Bartholomew’s Day Massacre of 1572… Read on

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“My Dearest Minette: Letters between Charles II and his sister”

Ruth Norrington’s beautifully-bound and carefully selected compilation of letters between King Charles II and his sister, Henrietta, Duchesse d’Orleans is a wonderful read for anyone remotely interested in the Restoration court and the colourful people associated with it. [amazon template=image&chan=default&asin=0720609917] The book begins with an excellent, concise short history of the time shortly before and after the birth… Read on

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Marie Adélaïde of Savoy, Dauphine of France

Marie Adélaïde of Savoy, Dauphine of France, was born on the 6th day of December, 1685. 1685 was, of course, a big year for the 17th century, and this Seventeenth Century Lady’s birth is often overlooked. She had a short life, sadly, for she died only 26 years later. I’ve been quite intrigued by this young lady, who… Read on

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Ballet at the Court of Louis XIV: Guest Post by Katy Werlin

Good day and welcome to today’s exquisite guest post from fashion historian Katy Werlin! I know Katy from Twitter and was delighted when she agreed to participate in this month’s guest posts. You’ll love it. Please welcome Katy to The Seventeenth Century Lady! Ballet at the Court of Louis XIV Ballet in the seventeenth century was completely different… Read on

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The Allure of the Royal Mistress

My article, “The Allure of the Royal Mistress” is now available on The Huffington Post. Below, I have images of the women I mention in the article: 1) Aspasia, mistress of Pericles: 2) Queen Cleopatra of Egypt: 3) Diane de Poitiers: 4) Anne Boleyn: 5) Nell Gwynn: 6) Barbara Palmer (Villiers): 7) Madame de Montespan: 8) Madame de… Read on

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Le Roi Henri IV of France

Today, the 14th of May, was an extremely important day for 17th-century France. King Henri IV, previously known as the King of Navarre, was assassinated by a Catholic, on this day in 1610. In his youth, Henri was one of the most important Huguenot (French Calvinist Protestant) leaders besides figures such as Admiral Coligny. The year was 1572… Read on

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Élisabeth Jacquet de La Guerre

Famous female Baroque composers are so rare that this post is of particular importance. Élisabeth Jacquet, French musical prodigy who sang, played harpsichord, organ, and composed beautiful pieces of Baroque, was born on the 17th of March, 1665, in Paris, France, to a musical family. You probably haven’t heard about Élisabeth, but she was such an extraordinary individual,… Read on

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400th Anniversary of André Le Nôtre’s Birth!

Today marks the 400th anniversary of the birth of French Baroque landscape architect, André Le Nôtre! He was born on the 12th of March, 1613, in Paris. Le Nôtre’s garden designs can be seen at the Baroque Chateau de Versailles and Vaux-le-Vicomte. What is so special about le Notre? Well, he worked for King Louis XIV, the Sun King, and French Baroque… Read on

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The King’s Whore

If you love periwigs as much as I do, you’ll love this film. Periwigs galore! Set during the late Seventeenth century, The King’s Whore (1990) also known as La putain du roi, or La puttana del re, is based on the true story of French-born Jeanne Baptiste d’Albert de Luynes, Countess of Verua who became the mistress of Vittorio Amedeo… Read on

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Simon Vouet

Simon Vouet, French painter who helped usher in the elaborate Italian Baroque style of painting into France, was born on this day the 9th of January, 1590. King Louis XIII’s wife (and King Louis XIV’s mother) Anne of Austria posed for Vouet in this next painting, where she is depicted as Minerva:   As you can see, Vouet… Read on

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Michel-Richard Delalande

Today’s Baroque Birthday Boy is Michel-Richard Delalande. Delalande has, over the years, become rather forgotten amongst his more popular contemporaries, which included the flamboyant Jean-Baptiste Lully and  François Couperin. Delalande was famous in his day for writing exquisite grands motets (sacred music), popular with the Sun King, Louis XIV. Read more about him here. Here is Delalande’s “Confitebor tibi… Read on

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De Gouden Eeuw Series

Love the Dutch Golden Age? Then you will love the new documentary series entitled, “De Gouden Eeuw,” which will be broadcasted beginning tonight in The Netherlands. I was delighted to have been asked to participate in this major documentary, and should appear in what I believe is the last episode of the series – Episode 13, where I… Read on

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