Category Archives: 18th Century

“A Glorious Poison: The Deadly Toxins of Palace Life”: A Guest Post by Eleanor Herman

A Glorious Poison: The Deadly Toxins of Palace Life by Eleanor Herman, exclusively on The Seventeenth Century Lady. The royal lifestyle of yesteryear used to make me swoon. I imagined myself living in a gilded palace, wearing gorgeous gowns, and dancing with Baroque studs at candlelight balls. I thought of the past as a time of romance, grandeur,… Read on

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‘Pray Stay Till Sunday’ – Queen Anne’s letters to Sarah Churchill, Guest Post by Joanne Limburg

Please welcome Joanne Limburg to The Seventeenth Century Lady! I’ve known Joanne for several years now because we started working on our novels at the same time (me on William & Mary, she on A Want of Kindness). Joanne’s novel is soon to be released (and I’m still looking for a publisher!), so please give a warm welcome to… Read on

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Roxana by Daniel Defoe

After many years of wanting to read Daniel Defoe’s Roxana: The Fortunate Mistress, I have just finished listening to the unabridged Audible audiobook recording of this classic. Daniel Defoe who lived from 1660 – 1731, was a fascinating historical figure: he was a rebel in Monmouth’s Rebellion in 1685, to his work as a spy, and his books A Journal of the Plague… Read on

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Castle Howard, Yorkshire

Yesterday on Hoydens and Firebrands, I submitted a short post about He Who Commissioned Castle Howard – Charles Howard,  3rd Earl of Carlisle. Following on from that post, which gives an overview about the life of the Charles Howard, I would like to share what I learned there this weekend and some photos from my visit, if I… Read on

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Jacobean, Jacobites, and Jacobins…

OK! I’ve had one too many messages from people who are confusing these terms, so I thought it’s time to clear these things up! It’s easy to get confused as each of these words begins with Jacob, but they are very, very different things. So, it’s Seventeenth Century Lady to the rescue! JACOBEAN: Of, or pertaining to, the… Read on

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Abington Park Museum, Northampton

I walked over to the local Abington Park Museum today and took a few photos to share with you. As it less than a 10 minute walk from my in-law’s house here in Northampton, I have visited it several times. There has been a house on this land since the late 1000s, but what I am very interested… Read on

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The Painted Hall, Old Royal Naval College

I finally was able to visit the Painted Hall at the Old Royal Naval College at Greenwich, and egads! it was an amazing experience. First you see the towering architectural buildings designed by the great Sir Christopher Wren and Nicholas Hawksmoor in 1698: I looked up to see the intertwined initials of Queen Anne and George, and William… Read on

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Liselotte, Duchesse d’Orléans

Elisabeth Charlotte von der Pfalz, also known simply as Liselotte, Duchesse d’Orléans, was quite a character and is rather popular amongst Early Modern historians to this day. Liselotte was born on this day the 27th of May, 1652. Some people think Liselotte was a lesbian, as she was certainly a tomboy. Neither feminine, beautiful, nor particularly interested in diversions… Read on

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Élisabeth Jacquet de La Guerre

Famous female Baroque composers are so rare that this post is of particular importance. Élisabeth Jacquet, French musical prodigy who sang, played harpsichord, organ, and composed beautiful pieces of Baroque, was born on the 17th of March, 1665, in Paris, France, to a musical family. You probably haven’t heard about Élisabeth, but she was such an extraordinary individual,… Read on

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Georg Philipp Telemann

Georg Philipp Telemann, German Baroque composer, was born on the 14th of March, 1681. He was a godfather to Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, son of fellow German Baroque composer, Johann Sebastian Bach. Musique de table: Tafelmusik in d-minor for flutes and continuo: Whilst his work flourished, his personal life was painful. His first wife died only a short time… Read on

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The Death of William III

[THIS IS AVAILABLE AS A FREE PODCAST ON ITUNES] “William III died in a riding accident.” How many times have I heard this? According to the evidence, this was almost certainly not the case. William III had a constant battle with his lungs and it was a problem with his lungs that lead to his death – not… Read on

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Rob Roy MacGregor

The Scottish hero popularly known as Rob Roy, was baptised on the 7th of March, 1678, by Loch Katrine. A teenaged Rob Roy has a little cameo in my book due to his involvement in Bonny Dundee’s Jacobite uprising against William & Mary. Many clans, though Presbyterian or Protestant, supported Catholic King James II on principle for he was… Read on

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Leeds Castle, Kent

Leeds Castle in Kent (NOT in Leeds!) is a picturesque castle surrounded by water from the River Len. When I visited the palace, it was an ugly, muddy, rainy day, so unfortunately only one of the outdoor shots is good enough to post. Before you look at the photos, please allow me to apologise for being in most… Read on

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Arcangelo Corelli

One of the giants of Italian Baroque, Arcangelo Corelli’s music is a masterful example of this musical style. Born a posthumous son on the 17th of February, 1653, in Fusignano, he is therefore today’s Baroque Birthday Boy! Corelli worked hard and was accepted into Bologna’s much-esteemed Accademica Filarmonica (Source: Tafelmusik) which had been founded in 1666. With his great dedication to… Read on

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The King’s Whore

If you love periwigs as much as I do, you’ll love this film. Periwigs galore! Set during the late Seventeenth century, The King’s Whore (1990) also known as La putain du roi, or La puttana del re, is based on the true story of French-born Jeanne Baptiste d’Albert de Luynes, Countess of Verua who became the mistress of Vittorio Amedeo… Read on

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Johann Joseph Fux

Johann Joseph Fux (pronounced “Fyooks” !) was an Austrian composer of Baroque music, born in the Austrian duchy of Styria, in 1660. Fux was employed by royal patrons including Holy Roman Emperors Leopold I, Joseph I, and Charles VI. Here is Fux’s Overture in D minor: Next are Sonata K.366, Sonata K.375, Sonata K.377: His “Missa Corporis Christi:” Fux was not… Read on

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Review: “The Gin Lane Gazette” by Adrian Teal

It’s that time of year again where we all wonder what to give to that special someone, friend, or relative. Enter “The Gin Lane Gazette”… I received my signed copy of “The Gin Lane Gazette” a few days ago and I loved it, and think this would be a wonderful gift to give this holiday season. What is… Read on

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