Tag Archives: William & Mary

Review: The Royal Way of Death by Olivia Bland

I really wanted to like this, I really did, but I had some issues with this book. I have to take into consideration that it was written in the 80s, but that really can’t be an excuse for some of the mistakes I found. I’ve based this review on the Stuart section of the book since that is… Read on

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‘Pray Stay Till Sunday’ – Queen Anne’s letters to Sarah Churchill, Guest Post by Joanne Limburg

Please welcome Joanne Limburg to The Seventeenth Century Lady! I’ve known Joanne for several years now because we started working on our novels at the same time (me on William & Mary, she on A Want of Kindness). Joanne’s novel is soon to be released (and I’m still looking for a publisher!), so please give a warm welcome to… Read on

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When Kensington Palace Became a Royal Residence

My article, “When Kensington Palace Became a Royal Residence” is now available on English Historical Fiction Authors. There’s something about Kensington Palace that immediately conjures up the word glamorous. Perhaps it is because in recent memory, it has been the home of notable, glamorous royals such as the late Princess Margaret, the late Diana, Princess of Wales, and… Read on

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A Time of Profound Change: A Guest Post By Ann Swinfen

Please welcome Ann Swinfen to The Seventeenth Century Lady! A Time of Profound Change By Ann Swinfen I have published two novels set in the seventeenth century: Flood and This Rough Ocean. Why the seventeenth century? This is a period which some people regard as less colourful than the sixteenth century, but is that true? It seems to me that… Read on

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The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford

Being that the Ashmolean Museum is one of the finest in the world and that it happens to have been created in the 17th-century, I was thrilled to have been able to finally visit last Wednesday. One can live in a country for years and sadly miss out on some of the gems. I met up with my… Read on

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Guest Post by Anna Belfrage: “Falling in Love with Mr Unknown”

Today I have the pleasure of welcome my friend – and fellow 17th-century buff – Anna Belfrage to The Seventeenth Century Lady. Anna has written several wonderful historical novels, and I’m sure you’ll love her guest post. _______________ Falling in Love with Mr Unknown – How One Painting Inspired a Whole Series It’s all the fault of the… Read on

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The Royal Greenwich Early Music Festival & Exhibition 2014

Last Friday, I travelled to Greenwich’s gorgeous Old Royal Naval College (designed by Mr Baroquetastic Sir Christopher Wren) for the Royal Greenwich Early Music Festival & Exhibition 2014. It was amazing! The festival took place from the 13th-15th of November and was filled with events and the exhibition comprised the ‘World’s Largest Early Music Fair’. The Early Music Shop –… Read on

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Dura Lex Sed Lex: Huguenots and the Promises of Kings: Guest Post by Master Piers Alexander, Scribbler

Please welcome award-winning novelist Piers Alexander to The Seventeenth Century Lady! Dura lex sed lex: The law is harsh, but it is the law. For Huguenots in the 1600s, royal edicts were instruments of hope and despair, both in France and in England. Slaughtered for their faith in the sixteenth century (the St Bartholomew’s Day Massacre of 1572… Read on

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Review: The Crucible starring Richard Armitage

It’s not often one is able to see one’s favourite actor in a play set in the 17th century, so when I saw the poster below on the Tube recently, I immediately scrambled to get seats for this production of Arthur Miller’s The Crucible. By the time I was looking for tickets, there were very few seats available,… Read on

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The Orange Way: Guest Post by Edna MacLoy

I’ve known Edna MacLoy for several years now and it is great pleasure to introduce her to you all today. I’m certain you will enjoy the post as much as I have. – A The Orange Way William III and the Glorious Revolution of 1688/1689 William of Orange, stadtholder of the Republic of the Seven United Provinces, landed… Read on

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The Death of Queen Mary II

This post is dedicated to Mary, a controversial, intelligent, beautiful, ill-fated, yet beloved Queen, died on this day the 28th of December, 1694. She was only thirty-two years old.   I say that she was controversial because her reign was, and still is, a subject of controversy. You see, William and Mary were invited to take the throne… Read on

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Jacobean, Jacobites, and Jacobins…

OK! I’ve had one too many messages from people who are confusing these terms, so I thought it’s time to clear these things up! It’s easy to get confused as each of these words begins with Jacob, but they are very, very different things. So, it’s Seventeenth Century Lady to the rescue! JACOBEAN: Of, or pertaining to, the… Read on

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Identify the causes and consequences of the seventeenth century social and political changes

My assignment for my online course, in case you were interested! The Seventeenth Century was a remarkable time in the history of the world. It was a time of growth in terms of economy and global trade, colonial expansionism, and at the same time, the roots of the modern world took hold. Both conquerors and conquered peoples had… Read on

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Sarah, Duchess of Marlborough: Guest Post by Debra Brown

Please welcome historical fiction writer, Debra Brown to The Seventeenth Century Lady! Debra was kind enough to invite me to write The Stuart Curse: The Tragic Lives of a 17th-Century Dynasty on a website that she runs, English Historical Fiction Authors. Sarah, Duchess of Marlborough by Debra Brown Sarah, Duchess of Marlborough, held an influential position in the court… Read on

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Royal Burials of the 17th Century: Guest Post by Tour Guide Girl

For the readers of this fine blog who don’t have the foggiest idea who I am, may I introduce myself? I’m Tour Guide Girl, tweeter, (sporadic) blogger and owner of Tourbauchery Bawdy Walks in London. Thank you to the 17th Century Lady for inviting me to write a guest article, I’m honoured to oblige! We, as history nerds,… Read on

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The Painted Hall, Old Royal Naval College

I finally was able to visit the Painted Hall at the Old Royal Naval College at Greenwich, and egads! it was an amazing experience. First you see the towering architectural buildings designed by the great Sir Christopher Wren and Nicholas Hawksmoor in 1698: I looked up to see the intertwined initials of Queen Anne and George, and William… Read on

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William & Mary’s Cipher at Kensington Palace

I only realised recently that I have spent an enormous amount of time at Kensington Palace over the past four years, yet I have very few photos to show of my favourite palace. Let’s fix that, shall we?! I’ll begin with the oldest part of the whole building which was used for Queen Mary II. So, here is… Read on

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The Birth of Queen Mary II

That beauteous, intelligent, sensitive woman, Mary Stuart, who later became Queen Mary II of England, Scotland, and Ireland, was born on this day 30th of April, 1662.   Her mother was Anne Hyde, a commoner who had become the Duchess of York upon marrying James, Duke of York, younger brother to Charles II. The birth took place at… Read on

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Review: “Fit to Rule”

I have just finished watching an episode of “Fit to Rule”. I shall comment on this one in particular, as I haven’t been able to see the previous episodes. I was working in the other room when my family called me down because Lucy Worsley was on the telly. As I sat down I heard her begin to… Read on

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Rob Roy MacGregor

The Scottish hero popularly known as Rob Roy, was baptised on the 7th of March, 1678, by Loch Katrine. A teenaged Rob Roy has a little cameo in my book due to his involvement in Bonny Dundee’s Jacobite uprising against William & Mary. Many clans, though Presbyterian or Protestant, supported Catholic King James II on principle for he was… Read on

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Elegant Evelyn

John Evelyn is my favourite diarist of the 17th century. Why? He calmly noted things that happened, what he observed, with none of the high marital drama that Pervy Pepys recounted in his diary. Also, he was far more prolific in his writing than the far more popular Pepys – he travelled extensively for man of his time,… Read on

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Henrietta Wentworth – The Woman Who Stole a Duke’s Heart

I’ve been researching Henrietta Wentworth in more depth since beginning my novella about her relationship with the Duke of Monmouth. I find her fascinating, though some of my peers seem quite happy to brush her off as “dull.” I don’t see that, I see a woman who did what other women could not do – have a truly… Read on

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