Tag Archives: English Civil War

When Truth Exceeds Fiction – Guest Post by Alison Stuart

Thank you so much for hosting me today, Andrea. I love having an opportunity to share my passion for the 17th century with a soul sister! I thought I would take a moment to talk about the inspiration behind my recent release THE KING’S MAN which is set at the height of the Interregnum (1654). So often truth… Read on

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The Rise of Sir William Brereton – Guest Post by D.W. Bradbridge

Please welcome D.W. Bradbridge to The Seventeenth Century Lady! Bradbridge writes historical fiction set in the 17th-century (by the way, his novel The Winter Siege is on a Kindle Countdown Deal from Aug 27 – September 2 during which time it will be £0.99 on Amazon UK!). Daniel Cheswis, the lead character in my novels, The Winter Siege and… Read on

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Weekly Wrap-up No. 4!

Good day to you! I can’t believe another week has passed. Egads! Well, if you missed any major things this week on Facebook or Twitter, you’ve come the right place. It’s time for our weekly wrap-up! News 17th-century shipbuilding historian and brilliant artist Richard Endsor (he created the artwork in the lovely poster below!) recently got in touch and… Read on

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Remembering King Charles I at St. George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle

Following his brutal execution on that cold morning of the 30th of January, 1648/9, King Charles’s body was eventually transported here to Windsor. He was buried in St. George’s Chapel, in the same vault as King Henry VIII and his third wife, Jane Seymour. I met up with Mr. Rigopoulos of the Royal Stuart Society for a coffee… Read on

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The English Civil War Society Parade, 2015

Yesterday, Sunday the 25th of January, I attended the English Civil War Society’s King’s Army Parade on the Mall in London. This is an annual commemorative event to mark the execution of King Charles I (whom some refer to as the Martyr-King) in 1648/9. It was on the very cold morning on the 30th of January 1648 (Old Style… Read on

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The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford

Being that the Ashmolean Museum is one of the finest in the world and that it happens to have been created in the 17th-century, I was thrilled to have been able to finally visit last Wednesday. One can live in a country for years and sadly miss out on some of the gems. I met up with my… Read on

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The Prujean Chest at the Royal College of Physicians

Yesterday evening, following a good old research session at the National Archives at Kew, I attended a lecture at the Royal College of Physicians in London. The lecture, entitled, ‘Losing sight of Glory’: Six centuries of battlefield surgery,’ and given by Michael Crumplin, was superb.  Before the lecture began, however, we were all able to view the Prujean Chest,… Read on

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Review: “Killers of the King” by Charles Spencer

A few months ago, I found out about this upcoming release from Charles Spencer. Naturally, given its subject matter, I was excited. I was jumping up and down when I received an advanced copy of “Killers of the King – the Men Who Dared to Execute Charles I”. I’ll be frank, this was the first history book I’ve read by… Read on

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Aston Hall, Birmingham

On Friday I had the great honour of visiting the gorgeous, great Jacobean house, Aston Hall. What is Aston Hall, and why is it important? Well, let’s start off with the introduction from the official guide book, shall we? Aston Hall is a magnificent Grade I Listed Jacobean mansion sitting in a Grade II Listed Park…Constructed between 1618… Read on

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“My Dearest Minette: Letters between Charles II and his sister”

Ruth Norrington’s beautifully-bound and carefully selected compilation of letters between King Charles II and his sister, Henrietta, Duchesse d’Orleans is a wonderful read for anyone remotely interested in the Restoration court and the colourful people associated with it. [amazon template=image&chan=default&asin=0720609917] The book begins with an excellent, concise short history of the time shortly before and after the birth… Read on

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Prince Rupert of the Rhine: Romantic Hero, Scientist, Cavalier & Lover

There is little doubt that Rupert of the Rhine is still capable of attracting admirers – even after being dead for over 300 years. Not only is he known as one of the Handsomest Men of the 17th Century, but he also was an excellent soldier, scientist, artist and more. And he happened to be a Prince, too.… Read on

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Identify the causes and consequences of the seventeenth century social and political changes

My assignment for my online course, in case you were interested! The Seventeenth Century was a remarkable time in the history of the world. It was a time of growth in terms of economy and global trade, colonial expansionism, and at the same time, the roots of the modern world took hold. Both conquerors and conquered peoples had… Read on

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17th Century Secrets of 10 Downing Street: Guest Post by Deborah Swift

The Seventeenth Century Lady is excited to have a Guest Post from acclaimed historical fiction writer Deborah Swift! Whenever I see Downing Street on the news I am reminded that its name dates back to the 17th century and the English Civil War. George Downing was born in Ireland but studied in America at Harvard – he was… Read on

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Penning Series Novels: Guest post by Francine Howarth

Please welcome Historical fiction/romance writer, Francine Howarth to The Seventeenth Century Lady!  Thank you so much Andrea for inviting me over to your blog and for letting me run riot across the page brandishing sword, pistol and musket in true Cavalier style. But first, let me say I favour neither Cavalier or Parliamentarian within my series of novels set within the… Read on

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Courting the English Civil War – Guest Post by Alison Stuart

I am very pleased to welcome historical fiction author Alison Stuart to The Seventeenth Century Lady. Alison is both very talented and one of the nicest people I’ve met on the Twittersphere. So, please give her a very warm welcome! COURTING THE ENGLISH CIVIL WAR – Alison Stuart Hi Andrea…Thank you so much for the invitation to visit your… Read on

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Guest Post: Anita Seymour’s Royalist Rebel

I’m very pleased to welcome our first guest post ever here on The Seventeenth Century Lady, and this by historical fiction author Anita Seymour. Here she is in an interview with Elizabeth Murray, the star of Seymour’s biographical fiction novel, Royalist Rebel, which is set in our ever-interesting Seventeenth Century! Without further ado, take it away, Anita! Enjoy,… Read on

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The Battlefield at Naseby

Naseby is a small village in rural, picturesque Northamptonshire, England. With curving country lanes, and rolling hills of farmland sprawling into the distance, it’s tranquil and quiet, only interrupted by the sounds of passing vehicles on the motorway nearby. But it wasn’t like that during the Battle of Naseby, during the English Civil War, which encompassed the surrounding… Read on

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Elegant Evelyn

John Evelyn is my favourite diarist of the 17th century. Why? He calmly noted things that happened, what he observed, with none of the high marital drama that Pervy Pepys recounted in his diary. Also, he was far more prolific in his writing than the far more popular Pepys – he travelled extensively for man of his time,… Read on

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Hampton Court’s Cavalier Ghosts

The following is taken, verbatim, from the booklet “Is the palace haunted?: Palace phantoms,” from my most recent visit to Hampton Court Palace. Since many who read this blog may not be able to travel there, I thought I would type this up for your enjoyment and for you to learn about one of the many ghostly sightings… Read on

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Leeds Castle, Kent

Leeds Castle in Kent (NOT in Leeds!) is a picturesque castle surrounded by water from the River Len. When I visited the palace, it was an ugly, muddy, rainy day, so unfortunately only one of the outdoor shots is good enough to post. Before you look at the photos, please allow me to apologise for being in most… Read on

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The Devil’s Whore

The Devil’s Whore (2008) is a gorgeous four-part series set during the English Civil War which tells the tale of a beautiful teenaged girl, Angelica Fanshawe, who is rich, aristocratic, and lucky enough to be in the same social circles as King Charles I. She marries her best friend, Harry, who wants her to be submissive (rightly so,… Read on

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The Lady and the Highwayman

The Lady and the Highwayman, from 1989, starred Hugh Grant as Lord Lucius Vyne, also known as Silver Blade, the Royalist highwayman, and the beautiful Lysette Anthony as Panthea Vyne, the young lady he has promised to protect. Panthea’s story takes place after the English Civil War during the Interregnum in which Oliver Cromwell was Lord Protector. Panthea, beautiful, sweet,… Read on

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