Giveaway Time!

Happy New Year! To start us off, I want to run our second giveaway.

Enter NOW for your chance to win a signed paperback copy of “His Last Mistress”!

His Last Mistress Book Cover

Here’s how to enter:

In ONE sentence – what is your favourite thing about the 17th century? Use the comment function below to enter.

This giveaway ends on Friday the 10th of January, 2014 at 11:59pm GMT. The winner will be picked at random. Good luck!

THE WINNERS HAVE BEEN CHOSEN!

William and Brett, please contact me with your address information!

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Hear ye! 15 thoughts — so far — on “Giveaway Time!”:

  1. Dale C. Rice

    That Bonnie Prince CHARLES Edward Stewart is a Cousin of my early arriver family in DEDHAM Ma ca 1649. John RICE to Mary Hartwell to the Manning line at Captain STEARNS.

    Reply
  2. Beatrice Negoita

    I honestly prefer any era that’s not the present one! The 17th c. though drawns me in a particular way. It’s not just the charm and the beauty of it that speaks to me, it’s also the less pretty side, war, murder, affairs, executions, disease, death, and the way all of it echoed in the beliefs of those particular times.

    Reply
  3. jayne62

    The personalities who made their mark on history during this time, Nell Gwyn, Oliver Cromwell, Both King Charles’s, Samuel Peyps and many others.

    Reply
  4. Sarah Johnson

    I love the parallels between America today and the 17th century … the prominence of the theatrical crowd … the use of religious virtue to justify man’s inhumanity to man … the insensitivity of the ruling class … the similarities of their newsletters to our blogs … spying … climate change … of course, the English mostly rejected Puritanism after 10 tears, but here in America fundamentalism is alive and well; millions of people believe the Bible is factually true, that the end times are upon us, It’s only 15 years ago that America had several trials where children successfully testified against their teachers that satanism was practiced in their church schools … witchcraft wasn’t mentioned, but anyone who knew their history could see the parallels. I could go on, and no … I have yet to hit on a similarity between Monmouth and Wentworth’s romance to modern events, but with the help of your book I’m sure I’ll find some.

    Reply
  5. Catherine

    Le Grand Siècle!
    In one sentence: The invention of the modern novel as we still know it now by Madame de Lafayette with her book La Princesse de Clèves.

    Reply

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