HNS Oxford 2016

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Good day to you! From Friday 2nd to Sunday the 4th of September, I attended the Historical Novel Society Conference in Oxford. This was the second HNS conference I attended – the first being two years ago in London – but this was the first one in which I took part as a speaker. I had a really… Read on

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Review: House of Shadows by Nicola Cornick

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4.5 stars – I really liked this book, which is historical fiction, time-slip, fantasy, historical and contemporary romance, and even has a bit of murder mystery. There are three different storylines, one in the seventeenth century, the early nineteenth century, and present day. It should be no surprise that my favourite story was the one set in the… Read on

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Review: The Age of Genius by A.C. Grayling

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3/5 – This book left me with mixed feelings – especially as Grayling is one of the most respected modern philosophers and I had been excited to read the book (which I would suggest is good for those who already have knowledge about the time period). I agree with Grayling that the seventeenth century was an amazing time in… Read on

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The Merchant’s House, Marlborough, Wiltshire.

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After our stay at the Stonehenge campsite last Autumn, Gavin and I made our way to Marlborough, which is a lovely town in Wiltshire, England. This amazing house was built for and lived in by a wealthy seventeenth-century silk merchant named Thomas Bayly. The construction is believed to date from between 1653 and 1700, and the interiors have… Read on

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Hear ye! News from The Seventeenth Century Lady…

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Good day to you all! There are a number of things to mention here today. In April, I was one of the first contributors to the brand-new history magazine, History of Royals, and I was delighted to write a feature on the Romanovs. It was a wonderful experience, and I thoroughly enjoyed researching that imperial family from 1613-1918.… Read on

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“Maria Merian’s Butterflies” at the Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace

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The Queen’s Gallery at Buckingham Palace recently opened their latest exhibition, Maria Merian’s Butterflies on the 15th of April, 2016. According to the Press Office: “The exhibition will tell the extraordinary story of 17th-and-18th-century artist and explorer Maria Sibylla Merian through the superb collection of her work in the Royal Collection. In 1699, at the age of 52, Merian… Read on

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Robert Carey’s Ride: Guest Post by Josh Provan

Robert Carey 1st Earl of Monmouth circa 1591, English school. Montacute House.

I’ve travelled from England to Scotland so many times since I was a kid I’ve lost count. Perhaps that is why I find Robert Carey’s ride so interesting. But it was when I was standing before the gates of Richmond Palace, the place where the Tudor dynasty ended, that I really felt that I wanted to tell the… Read on

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Film Review: The Witch (2015)

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Released in 2015 in the US and 2016 in the UK, The Witch: A New England Folktale is soon to be released on DVD and Blu-Ray in the UK, having been in theatres in March. Having heard very good things about this film from friends in the US, I finally have the time to review it here. The… Read on

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Review: In the Footsteps of the Six Wives of Henry VIII

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Our latest review is of the new release In the Footsteps of the Six Wives of Henry VIII by Sarah Morris and Natalie Grueninger. Although this is not a book about the seventeenth-century, one mustn’t overlook the importance of the Tudors upon the Stuart period, and so I was happy to review it here on The Seventeenth Century… Read on

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Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution Exhibition at the National Maritime Museum

Samuel Pepys, John Hayls, 1666 © National Portrait Gallery, London

The National Maritime Museum’s latest exhibition Samuel Pepys: Plague, Fire, Revolution is the largest-ever exhibition about Samuel Pepys and has over 200 objects on display (some of which come from private collections!). Early last month, I attended a private viewing of this exhibition, and I finally have time to write my thoughts about it. With such a packed title, you… Read on

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Review: Masters of the Everyday, a new exhibition at the Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace

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Masters of the Everyday, a new exhibition at the Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace. For the purposes of this review, I will only be focusing on the 17th-century exhibition, although there is another which is being presented at the same time, High Spirits: The Comic Art of Thomas Rowlandson, comprising works from one of the wittiest and most popular caricaturists of… Read on

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Confessions of a Writer

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Good day to you! I can’t believe it’s Monday again – time certainly has been flying by. Today, we have something a little different from what I usually post on TSCL. I don’t usually do these tagged posts, but as I was tagged by Annelisa, who has been so kind to me on Twitter, I thought why not? … Read on

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Reviews: Four 17th-century history books

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Good day to you! I’ve been reading a lot, as usual, and these are some of my reviews of the recent books about 17th-century history that I’ve read, which may be of interest to you as well. Mark Kishlansky’s Charles I: An Abbreviated Life What a breath of fresh air was this book! All the time, one hears… Read on

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Film Review: The Wicked Lady (1945)

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The Wicked Lady is a film that was released in 1945 and starred Margaret Lockwood, James Mason, and Patricia Roc, and was set in 1683 England. The story begins with a young couple – Caroline and Ralph – who are happily engaged and set to marry in a few days’ time. Caroline, warm and genuine, is completely in… Read on

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Relaunch of The Seventeenth Century Lady Podcast!

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Hear ye! Hear ye! Today marks the relaunch of The Seventeenth Century Lady Podcast on iTunes, which we started back in 2013. What accounts for the two-year delay? Well, I started writing and my husband and I moved from one end of the country to the other. We’re aiming to deliver a professional, quality podcast to you every… Read on

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Review: The Royal Way of Death by Olivia Bland

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I really wanted to like this, I really did, but I had some issues with this book. I have to take into consideration that it was written in the 80s, but that really can’t be an excuse for some of the mistakes I found. I’ve based this review on the Stuart section of the book since that is… Read on

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Film Review: A Little Chaos (2015)

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I finally had the chance to see this film for my birthday (my husband bought me the DVD) and I loved every single minute of it. In fact, I was sad when it ended because I loved it so much! I think it was beautifully directed by Alan Rickman and all the actors were very well-cast. The sensitive,… Read on

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Review: Spirit of the Highway by Deborah Swift

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I received this copy of Deborah Swift’s new book in exchange for an honest review. I first came across Swift’s work (The Lady’s Slipper) when I was browsing in Victoria Station, London, a few years ago. I was happily surprised to find a traditionally published book set in the seventeenth century. Deborah is now the author of five… Read on

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Book Launch for The Stuarts in 100 Facts!

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On Saturday, I held my first-ever physical book launch at the Guildhall here in Windsor, England. It was a beautiful, sunny day and the Ascot Room in which my launch was held was just as lovely. The room has many portraits of notable historical figures and has lovely stained glass windows, an ornate chandelier in the middle of… Read on

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The Isle of Portland and Portland Castle

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Back in August, my husband and I went camping for one week during our travels throughout Hampshire, Dorset, Wiltshire, and Somerset. Whilst we stayed at the campsite near Bovington in Dorset, we traveled down past Weymouth and to the island of Portland. What possible seventeenth-century connections could be there? Well, quite a lot, as I soon found out.… Read on

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When Truth Exceeds Fiction – Guest Post by Alison Stuart

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Thank you so much for hosting me today, Andrea. I love having an opportunity to share my passion for the 17th century with a soul sister! I thought I would take a moment to talk about the inspiration behind my recent release THE KING’S MAN which is set at the height of the Interregnum (1654). So often truth… Read on

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Hurley and Henley-on-Thames

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This week’s camping has taken us into the Berkshire countryside, where we stayed at a lovely campground a pleasantly long walk from the village of Hurley. This idyllic village is precisely the sort of place foreigners like me imagine an English village to be. There are beautiful old buildings, some of which date back to the 12th century!… Read on

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