Tag Archives: Oliver Cromwell

Book Review: The White King – Charles I by Leanda de Lisle

The White King, Charles I, Traitor, Murderer, Martyr by Leanda de Lisle certainly has quite a provocative title. Charles I remains a very polarising figure, in much the same manner as his contemporary, Oliver Cromwell, and the labels of “traitor” and “murderer” will undoubtedly ruffle feathers of the more staunch monarchists out there. By the same token, “martyr” can… Read on

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When Truth Exceeds Fiction – Guest Post by Alison Stuart

Thank you so much for hosting me today, Andrea. I love having an opportunity to share my passion for the 17th century with a soul sister! I thought I would take a moment to talk about the inspiration behind my recent release THE KING’S MAN which is set at the height of the Interregnum (1654). So often truth… Read on

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‘The Stuarts in 100 Facts’ is now available to pre-order!

Hi, Everyone! I hope this finds you all well. I had quite a nice surprise yesterday when I checked my Amazon profile – I saw that 100 Facts is available to pre-order now, and the cover image features Prince William II of Orange. Although not a Stuart himself, he married one (Mary Stuart, Princess Royal and Princess of… Read on

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A Time of Profound Change: A Guest Post By Ann Swinfen

Please welcome Ann Swinfen to The Seventeenth Century Lady! A Time of Profound Change By Ann Swinfen I have published two novels set in the seventeenth century: Flood and This Rough Ocean. Why the seventeenth century? This is a period which some people regard as less colourful than the sixteenth century, but is that true? It seems to me that… Read on

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No Christmas For You! The Holiday Under Cromwell

Hello and welcome to a special Christmas Blog Hop post, and I would like to thank Helen Hollick for including me! My contribution is, of course, about the 17th-century. Anyone who loves Early Music and Early Modern history, as I do, can probably talk about the beautiful Christmas verses which were composed during the Elizabethan and Early Stuart… Read on

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Review: “Killers of the King” by Charles Spencer

A few months ago, I found out about this upcoming release from Charles Spencer. Naturally, given its subject matter, I was excited. I was jumping up and down when I received an advanced copy of “Killers of the King – the Men Who Dared to Execute Charles I”. I’ll be frank, this was the first history book I’ve read by… Read on

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17th Century Secrets of 10 Downing Street: Guest Post by Deborah Swift

The Seventeenth Century Lady is excited to have a Guest Post from acclaimed historical fiction writer Deborah Swift! Whenever I see Downing Street on the news I am reminded that its name dates back to the 17th century and the English Civil War. George Downing was born in Ireland but studied in America at Harvard – he was… Read on

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Royal Burials of the 17th Century: Guest Post by Tour Guide Girl

For the readers of this fine blog who don’t have the foggiest idea who I am, may I introduce myself? I’m Tour Guide Girl, tweeter, (sporadic) blogger and owner of Tourbauchery Bawdy Walks in London. Thank you to the 17th Century Lady for inviting me to write a guest article, I’m honoured to oblige! We, as history nerds,… Read on

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Courting the English Civil War – Guest Post by Alison Stuart

I am very pleased to welcome historical fiction author Alison Stuart to The Seventeenth Century Lady. Alison is both very talented and one of the nicest people I’ve met on the Twittersphere. So, please give her a very warm welcome! COURTING THE ENGLISH CIVIL WAR – Alison Stuart Hi Andrea…Thank you so much for the invitation to visit your… Read on

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Guest Post: Anita Seymour’s Royalist Rebel

I’m very pleased to welcome our first guest post ever here on The Seventeenth Century Lady, and this by historical fiction author Anita Seymour. Here she is in an interview with Elizabeth Murray, the star of Seymour’s biographical fiction novel, Royalist Rebel, which is set in our ever-interesting Seventeenth Century! Without further ado, take it away, Anita! Enjoy,… Read on

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The Battlefield at Naseby

Naseby is a small village in rural, picturesque Northamptonshire, England. With curving country lanes, and rolling hills of farmland sprawling into the distance, it’s tranquil and quiet, only interrupted by the sounds of passing vehicles on the motorway nearby. But it wasn’t like that during the Battle of Naseby, during the English Civil War, which encompassed the surrounding… Read on

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Mantegna’s “Triumphs of Caesar”

Hampton Court Palace in Surrey, England houses a number of beautiful, priceless historical objects, and the Triumphs of Caesar by Italian Renaissance painter Andrea Mantegna are no exception… Housed in the former Orangery built in the late Seventeenth century during the reign of William and Mary to house Queen Mary II’s many exotic plants, these gorgeous works of… Read on

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The Devil’s Whore

The Devil’s Whore (2008) is a gorgeous four-part series set during the English Civil War which tells the tale of a beautiful teenaged girl, Angelica Fanshawe, who is rich, aristocratic, and lucky enough to be in the same social circles as King Charles I. She marries her best friend, Harry, who wants her to be submissive (rightly so,… Read on

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Cromwell’s Prohibition of Christmas

Happy Christmas! The Christmas tree, the carolling, the feasting with friends and family – all this is the result of an amalgamation of cultural practices since even before the birth of Christ. This holiday has had its share of controversy over the past two thousand years, most notably (for me, anyway!) in the 1600s, but even today. In… Read on

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Sir Thomas Fairfax

Parliamentarian General Sir Thomas Fairfax, 3rd Lord Fairfax of Cameron, husband to Anne de Vere, father of Mary Fairfax, died on this day 12th November, 1671, in Yorkshire, England. Fairfax fought in the English Civil War as a General of the Parliamentarians (Roundheads). And though I think he backed the wrong side, he comes across as a noble, likeable, and good… Read on

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