Tag Archives: history

The Importance of St. George’s Day

The 23rd of April is St. George’s Day here in England. There is something inherently romantic in the many artistic depictions of St. George. He is often in full armour, brandishing a weapon, and on the verge of killing a dragon. Later on in this post, I hope to convey the importance of St. George in the history… Read on

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Weekly Wrap-Up No. 5!

I avoided using the Internet this weekend and was able to get some substantial work done, so I apologise for the tardiness of this post. My husband and I went up to visit his parents in Northampton on Saturday and we cooked them a homemade Indian curry. Earlier in the week, I met up with my friend, Pitt historian… Read on

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The Bucket List – Three Things I’ve Achieved

I’m a bit late coming onto the August Blog A Day Challenge, but I’ve been wanting to join in. So, here’s my first contribution about the three things I’ve achieved. 1) Becoming a historian. Ever since I was about nine, and was handed my first David Starkey book, about Henry VIII’s Six Wives, I knew I wanted to… Read on

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James I’s Death & Charles I’s Ascension to the Throne

James I of England, VI of Scotland, died on the 27th of March, 1625. He ruled over what is commonly referred to as the Jacobean era, which witnessed a continuance in the flourishing of art and theatre with the likes of William Shakespeare. Sir Walter Raleigh was executed under James I, and the infamous Gunpowder Plot of 1605 occurred during the… Read on

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The Gardens at Hever Castle

Continuing on from our last post on the history of Hever Castle, we come now to its gardens. Hever Castle is lovely, but it’s gardens are some of the most beautiful I’ve seen in the world. There are dozens of different varieties of flowers and plants along the sprawling landscape. It was here that I saw a garden of… Read on

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Johann Georg Pisendel

Johann Georg Pisendel, German Baroque composer/musician, was born on this day 26 December, 1687, and so that makes him today’s Baroque Birthday Boy! Born close to Nuremburg, Germany, Pisendel was born into an already musical family (which always helps) and he grew to become an exceptionally accomplished violinist and composer. He met and worked with some of the… Read on

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De Gouden Eeuw Series

Love the Dutch Golden Age? Then you will love the new documentary series entitled, “De Gouden Eeuw,” which will be broadcasted beginning tonight in The Netherlands. I was delighted to have been asked to participate in this major documentary, and should appear in what I believe is the last episode of the series – Episode 13, where I… Read on

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Review: “The Gin Lane Gazette” by Adrian Teal

It’s that time of year again where we all wonder what to give to that special someone, friend, or relative. Enter “The Gin Lane Gazette”… I received my signed copy of “The Gin Lane Gazette” a few days ago and I loved it, and think this would be a wonderful gift to give this holiday season. What is… Read on

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Death of Tycho Brahe

Tycho Brahe, Danish astronomer, died on this day 24 October, 1601, of what is believed to be mercury poisoning. A less widely known fact about Brahe is that he had a false nose ever since he lost his own in a duel over who was the best mathematician! Egads, eh? That must have hurt. As a result of his injuries… Read on

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Kensington Palace Garden History Tours

This is the first time Kensington Palace has offered Garden History Tours! They will be free of charge and last between 45 minutes to 1 hour. All you need to do is sign up at either the Queen’s Entrance or the hub area inside the palace. Please be aware these tours are only for the summer months, from… Read on

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Brian Sewell – The Last of the Medici

This is a really great show from the great Brian Sewell. I highly recommend anything by Sewell, as the man is highly articulate, highly educated, and has a very great taste in art and architecture.

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Historiography in the 20th Century

Andrea Zuvich February 7, 2006 Georg G. Iggers’ book, Historiography in the Twentieth Century,” Peter Amann’s, “Prelude to Insurrection: The Banquet of the People;” David Herlihy’s, “Three Patterns of Social Mobility in Medieval History;” and last but not least, John Zimmerman’s, “Charles Thomson: The Sam Adams of Philadelphia,” are all greatly influenced by the different philosophical schools of… Read on

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