Tag Archives: Charles II

Castle Howard, Yorkshire

Yesterday on Hoydens and Firebrands, I submitted a short post about He Who Commissioned Castle Howard – Charles Howard,  3rd Earl of Carlisle. Following on from that post, which gives an overview about the life of the Charles Howard, I would like to share what I learned there this weekend and some photos from my visit, if I… Read on

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The Country Wife by William Wycherley

I hope you all enjoyed our first selection for the 17th-Century Book Club, which was William Wycherley’s play, The Country Wife! This was the second time I read the play, and I wish I could have performed in it. I would like to apologise to you all for not having the forum up-and-running as I said I would, but… Read on

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“New Worlds”: A Biased Look at the 1680s

Many of you know that I was eagerly anticipating this programme ever since I heard about it. I am always so pleased when filmmakers decide to set a story in the 17th-century. The more programmes and films that are made about this time period will make it as popular as the Tudors are. I thought The Devil’s Whore… Read on

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Aston Hall, Birmingham

On Friday I had the great honour of visiting the gorgeous, great Jacobean house, Aston Hall. What is Aston Hall, and why is it important? Well, let’s start off with the introduction from the official guide book, shall we? Aston Hall is a magnificent Grade I Listed Jacobean mansion sitting in a Grade II Listed Park…Constructed between 1618… Read on

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“My Dearest Minette: Letters between Charles II and his sister”

Ruth Norrington’s beautifully-bound and carefully selected compilation of letters between King Charles II and his sister, Henrietta, Duchesse d’Orleans is a wonderful read for anyone remotely interested in the Restoration court and the colourful people associated with it. [amazon template=image&chan=default&asin=0720609917] The book begins with an excellent, concise short history of the time shortly before and after the birth… Read on

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The Death of Queen Mary II

This post is dedicated to Mary, a controversial, intelligent, beautiful, ill-fated, yet beloved Queen, died on this day the 28th of December, 1694. She was only thirty-two years old.   I say that she was controversial because her reign was, and still is, a subject of controversy. You see, William and Mary were invited to take the throne… Read on

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Charles Landseer & the Seventeenth Century

Charles Landseer was an artist who lived from 1799-1879. Landseer, though sadly not as popular as his painter brother Edwin (famous for his works for Queen Victoria), generally painted scenes depicting historical events or those from literature and each of his works vividly bring stories to life. Take for example this piece, “The Eve of the Battle of… Read on

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17th Century Secrets of 10 Downing Street: Guest Post by Deborah Swift

The Seventeenth Century Lady is excited to have a Guest Post from acclaimed historical fiction writer Deborah Swift! Whenever I see Downing Street on the news I am reminded that its name dates back to the 17th century and the English Civil War. George Downing was born in Ireland but studied in America at Harvard – he was… Read on

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Women During the Reign of Charles II: Guest Post by Richard Endsor

It’s such a delight to welcome Richard Endsor to The Seventeenth Century Lady! Richard tells us about some remarkable women during the Merry Monarch’s lusty reign. So, please give a very warm welcome to Richard! Women During the Reign of Charles II: Dear Andrea, thank you for inviting me as a guest to your beautifully presented blog. Following… Read on

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The Popish Plot: Guest Post by Susan Abernethy

Today we welcome historian Susan Abernethy, who is such a delight on her website, The Freelance History Writer, twitter, and Facebook. Please give her a warm welcome to The Seventeenth Century Lady as she tells us about The Popish Plot! Sir Francis Walsingham, was minister and spymaster during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I.  He fought diligently and… Read on

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English Baroque Music: A Guest Post by London Baroque

Today’s Guest Post comes from one of my absolute favourite Baroque groups: London Baroque. I was thrilled when they agreed to participate in our month of guest posts! So, please welcome London Baroque to The Seventeenth Century Lady! London Baroque is a professional chamber group consisting of three or four musicians and keyboard, to which we very often… Read on

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Penning Series Novels: Guest post by Francine Howarth

Please welcome Historical fiction/romance writer, Francine Howarth to The Seventeenth Century Lady!  Thank you so much Andrea for inviting me over to your blog and for letting me run riot across the page brandishing sword, pistol and musket in true Cavalier style. But first, let me say I favour neither Cavalier or Parliamentarian within my series of novels set within the… Read on

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The Children of Charles I: Guest Post by Eileen Oleary

I met today’s guest blogger on Twitter as we both love the 17th-century. I have asked Eileen if she would write a post about a topic from that era that she has long been fascinated by – and she graciously accepted. She has such great insight into Charles I’s time, that I’m very happy to have her contribute… Read on

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Masters, Commanders, & Courtesans: Fictionalising the Restoration Navy: Guest Post by J.D. Davies

Please welcome historian and author J.D. Davies to The Seventeenth Century Lady! When I first set out to write ‘The Journals of Matthew Quinton’, my series of naval historical novels set in the Restoration era, I realised very quickly that I’d have some pretty serious explaining to do. OK, there was plenty of that sort of explaining (‘yes,… Read on

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1660’s London: Guest Post by Katherine Pym

Please welcome 17th-century historical fiction author Katherine Pym to The Seventeenth Century Lady! My work in progress (WIP) is titled The Barbers, a historical novel set in London 1663. Due to the current events of the 1660’s, my goal is to write a novel per year until 1666. So far, I have released stories that mark each year 1660-1662. This… Read on

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Royal Burials of the 17th Century: Guest Post by Tour Guide Girl

For the readers of this fine blog who don’t have the foggiest idea who I am, may I introduce myself? I’m Tour Guide Girl, tweeter, (sporadic) blogger and owner of Tourbauchery Bawdy Walks in London. Thank you to the 17th Century Lady for inviting me to write a guest article, I’m honoured to oblige! We, as history nerds,… Read on

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Why I Love the 17th Century Royal Navy: Guest Post by Samuel McLean

I first started my love affair with the Royal Navy of the latter half of the seventeenth century during my second year of University. As a Christmas present that year, my friend Pippa presented me with Arthur Herman’s To Rule the Waves: How the British Navy Shaped the Modern World. [amazon asin=0060534257&template=image&chan=default] This book fascinated me, and inspired… Read on

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The Great Fire of London, 1666

The Great Fire of London was one of the great catastrophes to hit the reign of Charles II. Following the horrendous Great Plague of 1665, the only silver lining in this conflagration is that it seems to have eradicated the plague. Great! But we don’t really know how many people died, as the records don’t seem to take… Read on

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Five interview questions for a historical figure!

In an interview with Charles II, I would ask the following: Were you frightened that the same fate that befell your father would eventually happen to you? Once and for all, were you, or were you not, married to Lucy Walter? If not, why do you believe there was such intense speculation surrounding your relationship with her? Where… Read on

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Monmouth’s Resting Place in the Chapel of St. Peter ad Vincula

On Monday the 15th of July, I went to Tower Hill where I spoke about the life of James Scott, Duke of Monmouth. I will now include photos and excerpts I used from contemporary sources. It was a beautiful day to remember a beautiful man. It was a very hot and sunny, and I bought two bouquets of… Read on

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The Allure of the Royal Mistress

My article, “The Allure of the Royal Mistress” is now available on The Huffington Post. Below, I have images of the women I mention in the article: 1) Aspasia, mistress of Pericles: 2) Queen Cleopatra of Egypt: 3) Diane de Poitiers: 4) Anne Boleyn: 5) Nell Gwynn: 6) Barbara Palmer (Villiers): 7) Madame de Montespan: 8) Madame de… Read on

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