Tag Archives: Charles I

Castle Howard, Yorkshire

Yesterday on Hoydens and Firebrands, I submitted a short post about He Who Commissioned Castle Howard – Charles Howard,  3rd Earl of Carlisle. Following on from that post, which gives an overview about the life of the Charles Howard, I would like to share what I learned there this weekend and some photos from my visit, if I… Read on

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Aston Hall, Birmingham

On Friday I had the great honour of visiting the gorgeous, great Jacobean house, Aston Hall. What is Aston Hall, and why is it important? Well, let’s start off with the introduction from the official guide book, shall we? Aston Hall is a magnificent Grade I Listed Jacobean mansion sitting in a Grade II Listed Park…Constructed between 1618… Read on

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Francis Bacon

One of my favourite essayists is Francis Bacon (1561–1626), & it irritates me to no end that people think I’m referring to the weird modern artist (1909–1992) when I’m talking about him. The artist is now, and I think lamentably, more popular than the first famous Francis Bacon; and so my aim with this article is to make you… Read on

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“My Dearest Minette: Letters between Charles II and his sister”

Ruth Norrington’s beautifully-bound and carefully selected compilation of letters between King Charles II and his sister, Henrietta, Duchesse d’Orleans is a wonderful read for anyone remotely interested in the Restoration court and the colourful people associated with it. [amazon template=image&chan=default&asin=0720609917] The book begins with an excellent, concise short history of the time shortly before and after the birth… Read on

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Prince Rupert of the Rhine: Romantic Hero, Scientist, Cavalier & Lover

There is little doubt that Rupert of the Rhine is still capable of attracting admirers – even after being dead for over 300 years. Not only is he known as one of the Handsomest Men of the 17th Century, but he also was an excellent soldier, scientist, artist and more. And he happened to be a Prince, too.… Read on

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Charles Landseer & the Seventeenth Century

Charles Landseer was an artist who lived from 1799-1879. Landseer, though sadly not as popular as his painter brother Edwin (famous for his works for Queen Victoria), generally painted scenes depicting historical events or those from literature and each of his works vividly bring stories to life. Take for example this piece, “The Eve of the Battle of… Read on

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The Children of Charles I: Guest Post by Eileen Oleary

I met today’s guest blogger on Twitter as we both love the 17th-century. I have asked Eileen if she would write a post about a topic from that era that she has long been fascinated by – and she graciously accepted. She has such great insight into Charles I’s time, that I’m very happy to have her contribute… Read on

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Royal Burials of the 17th Century: Guest Post by Tour Guide Girl

For the readers of this fine blog who don’t have the foggiest idea who I am, may I introduce myself? I’m Tour Guide Girl, tweeter, (sporadic) blogger and owner of Tourbauchery Bawdy Walks in London. Thank you to the 17th Century Lady for inviting me to write a guest article, I’m honoured to oblige! We, as history nerds,… Read on

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Why I Love the 17th Century Royal Navy: Guest Post by Samuel McLean

I first started my love affair with the Royal Navy of the latter half of the seventeenth century during my second year of University. As a Christmas present that year, my friend Pippa presented me with Arthur Herman’s To Rule the Waves: How the British Navy Shaped the Modern World. [amazon asin=0060534257&template=image&chan=default] This book fascinated me, and inspired… Read on

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Courting the English Civil War – Guest Post by Alison Stuart

I am very pleased to welcome historical fiction author Alison Stuart to The Seventeenth Century Lady. Alison is both very talented and one of the nicest people I’ve met on the Twittersphere. So, please give her a very warm welcome! COURTING THE ENGLISH CIVIL WAR – Alison Stuart Hi Andrea…Thank you so much for the invitation to visit your… Read on

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The Queen’s House, Greenwich

The Queen’s House in Greenwich is located in the same area as the Old Royal Naval College, the Maritime Museum, Greenwich Park, and is a short walk away from the Greenwich Observatory and Greenwich Market. Once a royal retreat, it is now a free museum open to the enjoyment of all. I took as many photos as I… Read on

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Tempe Restored – A 17th Century Masque at Banqueting House

I went to the Press Preview of the new, vibrant, stunning new exhibition/experience at Banqueting House in Whitehall yesterday. From the 19th of July to 1 September 2013, Banqueting House has been transformed into the world of the 17th-century masque. All photos by me. The original Banqueting House at Whitehall Palace was destroyed by fire, and the current… Read on

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Guest Post: Anita Seymour’s Royalist Rebel

I’m very pleased to welcome our first guest post ever here on The Seventeenth Century Lady, and this by historical fiction author Anita Seymour. Here she is in an interview with Elizabeth Murray, the star of Seymour’s biographical fiction novel, Royalist Rebel, which is set in our ever-interesting Seventeenth Century! Without further ado, take it away, Anita! Enjoy,… Read on

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The Greatest Romances Are Tragedies

I am an unabashed romantic. That being said, I do not require the majority of the books I read to end happily ever after. In fact, all of my favourite romances from history and literature have been tragic. I grew up reading Arthurian legends, Thomas Hardy, Shakespeare’s tragedies, and more. I must be frank with you, I have… Read on

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The Battlefield at Naseby

Naseby is a small village in rural, picturesque Northamptonshire, England. With curving country lanes, and rolling hills of farmland sprawling into the distance, it’s tranquil and quiet, only interrupted by the sounds of passing vehicles on the motorway nearby. But it wasn’t like that during the Battle of Naseby, during the English Civil War, which encompassed the surrounding… Read on

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“In Fine Style: The Art of Tudor & Stuart Fashion” Review

I recently went to the amazing “In Fine Style: The Art of Tudor & Stuart Fashion” in the Queen’s Gallery at Buckingham Palace. I had just finished tours at Kensington Palace and then took the Number 9 bus (a Routemaster) from Palace Gate to Green Park and then walked across the beautiful Green Park towards Buckingham Palace. I… Read on

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Le Roi Henri IV of France

Today, the 14th of May, was an extremely important day for 17th-century France. King Henri IV, previously known as the King of Navarre, was assassinated by a Catholic, on this day in 1610. In his youth, Henri was one of the most important Huguenot (French Calvinist Protestant) leaders besides figures such as Admiral Coligny. The year was 1572… Read on

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James I’s Death & Charles I’s Ascension to the Throne

James I of England, VI of Scotland, died on the 27th of March, 1625. He ruled over what is commonly referred to as the Jacobean era, which witnessed a continuance in the flourishing of art and theatre with the likes of William Shakespeare. Sir Walter Raleigh was executed under James I, and the infamous Gunpowder Plot of 1605 occurred during the… Read on

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Elegant Evelyn

John Evelyn is my favourite diarist of the 17th century. Why? He calmly noted things that happened, what he observed, with none of the high marital drama that Pervy Pepys recounted in his diary. Also, he was far more prolific in his writing than the far more popular Pepys – he travelled extensively for man of his time,… Read on

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Mantegna’s “Triumphs of Caesar”

Hampton Court Palace in Surrey, England houses a number of beautiful, priceless historical objects, and the Triumphs of Caesar by Italian Renaissance painter Andrea Mantegna are no exception… Housed in the former Orangery built in the late Seventeenth century during the reign of William and Mary to house Queen Mary II’s many exotic plants, these gorgeous works of… Read on

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Lucrezia Borgia, Stuart ancestress?

Lucrezia Borgia is one of those figures in history that we are taught to believe was a really evil person. The name of Borgia alone conjures up a images of poison, ruthless ambition, incest, cruelty, among other unsavoury traits. More than likely, what we’ve learned about her is from anti-Borgia propaganda, and therefore, not to be taken as… Read on

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