Tag Archives: Charles I

The Golden Boy of the Jacobean Age: A Guest Post by Sarah Fraser

The Golden Boy of the Jacobean Age: first Prince of Wales of Great Britain, is this perhaps one of the greatest Kings we never had?   Discovering Henry Stuart, Prince of Wales (1594-1612), the drama, excitement and heartbreak of his all too brief life enchanted me. I have sons. I recognised in Henry the same young man’s insatiable… Read on

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Reviews: Four 17th-century history books

Good day to you! I’ve been reading a lot, as usual, and these are some of my reviews of the recent books about 17th-century history that I’ve read, which may be of interest to you as well. Mark Kishlansky’s Charles I: An Abbreviated Life What a breath of fresh air was this book! All the time, one hears… Read on

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Review: Spirit of the Highway by Deborah Swift

I received this copy of Deborah Swift’s new book in exchange for an honest review. I first came across Swift’s work (The Lady’s Slipper) when I was browsing in Victoria Station, London, a few years ago. I was happily surprised to find a traditionally published book set in the seventeenth century. Deborah is now the author of five… Read on

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The Reluctant Bride: A Jacobean Tragedy – A Guest Post by Pamela J. Womack

I am very pleased to have Pamela J. Womack’s company today on The Seventeenth Century Lady. I was privileged to read an Advanced Review Copy of her exquisitely crafted novel about the Duke of Buckingham – The Darling of Kings, and her love of the 17th-century shines through all of her work. The reluctant bride: A Jacobean Tragedy… Read on

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‘Rubens & His Legacy- Van Dyck to Cezanne’ Exhibition at the Royal Academy of Arts

Yesterday I visited the current Rubens exhibition at the Royal Academy of Arts on Piccadilly, London. This was my first time visiting this world-renowned place, and I would like to now share my observations and personal impressions, if I may. Artistic taste is very subjective, as I am well aware, but if you are looking for this to be… Read on

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Weekly Wrap-up No. 4!

Good day to you! I can’t believe another week has passed. Egads! Well, if you missed any major things this week on Facebook or Twitter, you’ve come the right place. It’s time for our weekly wrap-up! News 17th-century shipbuilding historian and brilliant artist Richard Endsor (he created the artwork in the lovely poster below!) recently got in touch and… Read on

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Remembering King Charles I at St. George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle

Following his brutal execution on that cold morning of the 30th of January, 1648/9, King Charles’s body was eventually transported here to Windsor. He was buried in St. George’s Chapel, in the same vault as King Henry VIII and his third wife, Jane Seymour. I met up with Mr. Rigopoulos of the Royal Stuart Society for a coffee… Read on

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The English Civil War Society Parade, 2015

Yesterday, Sunday the 25th of January, I attended the English Civil War Society’s King’s Army Parade on the Mall in London. This is an annual commemorative event to mark the execution of King Charles I (whom some refer to as the Martyr-King) in 1648/9. It was on the very cold morning on the 30th of January 1648 (Old Style… Read on

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“A villainous courtship: George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham and Lady Katherine Manners” – Guest Post by Ella March Chase

 I am very pleased to welcome acclaimed historical fiction author Ella March Chase to The Seventeenth Century Lady! Ella has written several books, and her latest book, The Queen’s Dwarf, is now out in paperback. Today, we have a wonderful guest post from Ms. Chase, which is sure to interest you all, especially those who have a particular… Read on

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The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford

Being that the Ashmolean Museum is one of the finest in the world and that it happens to have been created in the 17th-century, I was thrilled to have been able to finally visit last Wednesday. One can live in a country for years and sadly miss out on some of the gems. I met up with my… Read on

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Review: Darling of Kings by P.J. Womack

The Darling of Kings is a brilliant historical novel which charts the meteoric rise and fall of one of the most legendary personages in British history. I was intrigued and excited when I was offered the chance to read this novel about George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham and his relationships, first with King James I and then King Charles I. The Duke of Buckingham has been a source… Read on

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Short story: ‘Princeps Henricus’

This is the short story I recently submitted to the Historical Novel Society Conference on Saturday 6th September. The conference was really interesting and it was fun to meet up with fellow writers and great to learn from the most successful in our genre. There’s always so much to learn, and I was grateful to be able to… Read on

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Review: “Killers of the King” by Charles Spencer

A few months ago, I found out about this upcoming release from Charles Spencer. Naturally, given its subject matter, I was excited. I was jumping up and down when I received an advanced copy of “Killers of the King – the Men Who Dared to Execute Charles I”. I’ll be frank, this was the first history book I’ve read by… Read on

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Castle Howard, Yorkshire

Yesterday on Hoydens and Firebrands, I submitted a short post about He Who Commissioned Castle Howard – Charles Howard,  3rd Earl of Carlisle. Following on from that post, which gives an overview about the life of the Charles Howard, I would like to share what I learned there this weekend and some photos from my visit, if I… Read on

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Aston Hall, Birmingham

On Friday I had the great honour of visiting the gorgeous, great Jacobean house, Aston Hall. What is Aston Hall, and why is it important? Well, let’s start off with the introduction from the official guide book, shall we? Aston Hall is a magnificent Grade I Listed Jacobean mansion sitting in a Grade II Listed Park…Constructed between 1618… Read on

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Francis Bacon

One of my favourite essayists is Francis Bacon (1561–1626), & it irritates me to no end that people think I’m referring to the weird modern artist (1909–1992) when I’m talking about him. The artist is now, and I think lamentably, more popular than the first famous Francis Bacon; and so my aim with this article is to make you… Read on

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“My Dearest Minette: Letters between Charles II and his sister”

Ruth Norrington’s beautifully-bound and carefully selected compilation of letters between King Charles II and his sister, Henrietta, Duchesse d’Orleans is a wonderful read for anyone remotely interested in the Restoration court and the colourful people associated with it. [amazon template=image&chan=default&asin=0720609917] The book begins with an excellent, concise short history of the time shortly before and after the birth… Read on

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Prince Rupert of the Rhine: Romantic Hero, Scientist, Cavalier & Lover

There is little doubt that Rupert of the Rhine is still capable of attracting admirers – even after being dead for over 300 years. Not only is he known as one of the Handsomest Men of the 17th Century, but he also was an excellent soldier, scientist, artist and more. And he happened to be a Prince, too.… Read on

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Charles Landseer & the Seventeenth Century

Charles Landseer was an artist who lived from 1799-1879. Landseer, though sadly not as popular as his painter brother Edwin (famous for his works for Queen Victoria), generally painted scenes depicting historical events or those from literature and each of his works vividly bring stories to life. Take for example this piece, “The Eve of the Battle of… Read on

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The Children of Charles I: Guest Post by Eileen Oleary

I met today’s guest blogger on Twitter as we both love the 17th-century. I have asked Eileen if she would write a post about a topic from that era that she has long been fascinated by – and she graciously accepted. She has such great insight into Charles I’s time, that I’m very happy to have her contribute… Read on

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Royal Burials of the 17th Century: Guest Post by Tour Guide Girl

For the readers of this fine blog who don’t have the foggiest idea who I am, may I introduce myself? I’m Tour Guide Girl, tweeter, (sporadic) blogger and owner of Tourbauchery Bawdy Walks in London. Thank you to the 17th Century Lady for inviting me to write a guest article, I’m honoured to oblige! We, as history nerds,… Read on

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Why I Love the 17th Century Royal Navy: Guest Post by Samuel McLean

I first started my love affair with the Royal Navy of the latter half of the seventeenth century during my second year of University. As a Christmas present that year, my friend Pippa presented me with Arthur Herman’s To Rule the Waves: How the British Navy Shaped the Modern World. [amazon asin=0060534257&template=image&chan=default] This book fascinated me, and inspired… Read on

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